Monday, September 1, 2014

Pipes of the World: Cigarette pack insert cards (1927)


This complete set of 25 miniature, color illustrations, "Pipes of the World," was designed and produced by W. A. & A. C. Churchman (Imperial Tobacco, U. K.) in 1927. These cardboard graphics were inset to reinforce the paper wrapper of packs of cigarettes; as companies began to offer these in series, or sets, and they became collectibles. Thousands of themes were produced by many tobacco, gum, coffee and meat-extract companies. For the pipe smoker and the collector of tobacco ephemera, however, this particular set, and three others, "World's Smokers," a set of 50, released by the Allen & Ginter Company, Richmond, Virginia (1888), "Pipe History," a set of 25 from BBB (A. Frankau), U. K. (1926), and "World's Smokers," a set of 50 from Teofani & Co., U. K. (post-1920), have special significance.

Images of this set of cigarette cards, courtesy of Gary B. Schrier.



No1 East Africa - A. Bushbongo Tribe, Central congo - B. Ugandan Pipe - C. Dor Tribe, Upper Nile - D.Ugandan Pipe

No2 Equatorial Africa - A. Ivory Water-Pipe - B. Mambutto Chief's Pipe - C. Double travelling pipe - D. Gourd water pipe

No3 North Africa

No4 Africa - A. Gadeka wooden pipe - B. Brass & wood "Kaffir" pipe - C. Soapstone pipe from Kimberley.


No5 West Africa - A. Fan Tribe pipe - B. Ashanti pottery pipe - C. Gourd water-pipe,Loando Tribe, Angola.

 
 
No6 America - Early Pipes - A. Y shaped pipe from Hispaniola - B. Tube pipe of serpentine from California - C. Typical American-Indian mound pipe - D. Corn-cob pipe


No7 North America - A. Calumet or peace pipe B. Tomahawk pipe, English made (for trade) - C. The pipe bowl of A made of catlinite from South Dakota


No8 North American Coast - A. Shale pipe from Queen Charlotte Island - B. Carved pipe-bowl of walrus ivory - C. Boat shaped pipe


No9 Arctic Regions - Pipe used by Eastern Eskimo from Hudson Bay - B. Eskimo pipe of walrus ivory - C. Pipe of fossil mammoth ivory from East Siberia


No10 South America - A. Pipe of the Tupi Tribe, Amazon Basin - B. Chief's pipe, Paraguay - C. Pampas Indian pipe

 
No11 Asia, Borneo etc - A. Javanese pipe. - B. Batak pipe, Sumatra - C. Pipe from Sarawak




No12 Asia, Burma - A. Woman's water pipe, Burma - B. Kachin water pipe, Burma - C. Burmese bamboo pipe

 
No13 Asia, China etc - A&B. Chinese water pipes - C. Chinese pipe of coloured ivory - D. Japanese pipe - E. Korean pipe



No14 Asia, India - A. Narghile or cocoa-nut pipe - B. Elaborate silver covered Narghile - C. Hookah or water pipe

 
No15 Asiatic Russia etc - A. Siberian pipe of Chinese pattern - B. Khirgiz double pipe - C. Peasants pipe from Orenburg, Russia - D. Modern Russian pipe from Caspian area



No16 Asia Siam etc - A. Assam water-pipe - B. Nyoungwe pipe, Burma - C. Siamese water-pipe - D. Karen Tribe pipe from Central Burma






No17 Turkey A water Pipe; B Tophane Pipe


No18 Australasia - A. Primitive bamboo pipe by the Aborigines of Australia - B. Maori pipe from New Zealand



No19 New Guinea etc - A.New Guinea pipe - B. Shell pipe, Solomon Islands - C. Bamboo pipe, Torres Straits, New Guinea.



No20 North & Central Europe - A. Danish pipe with glazed porcelain bowl - B. Swiss pipe of similar design to A - C. Swedish wooden pipe - D. Norwegian brass pipe


No21 Central Europe - A.Polish earthenware pipe mounted on white metal - B. Austrian stoneware pipe - C. Austrian porcelain pipe with cherry wood stem



No22 South & West Europe - A. French clay pipe - B. Belgian nicotine pipe - C. Venetian glass pipe - D. Italian silver lined clay pipe



No23 England - A.17th century walnut-shell pipe - B. "Elfin" pipe c1600 - C. Clay pipe, Charles I era - D. Georgian clay pipe - E. Glazed earthenware "snake" pipe, 18th century.


No24 Germany - A. Double pipe bowl from Ulm - B. Meerschbaum pipe early 19th century - C. Elaborately carved pipe made from an antler, 19th century



No25 Holland - A&B. Gouda clay pipes of the 19th century - C. Wedding-present pipe decorated with silver of gold leaves

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